The accessibility of habits and grit…

It strikes me that two major determinants of success, habits and grit, are accessible to most people. Certainly, talent and intelligence will play a role in success, but I suspect they play more of a role in where we succeed, not whether we succeed. Those who succeed the most, I think, pursue their areas of special ability with good habits and grit. They recognize their strengths and follow them, but continuing to work on their weaknesses.

Much like the tortoise and the hare, those who continue to move forward may succeed despite an apparent lack of native ability. Fortunately, habits and grit can change, even if we can’t change your native ability. This is how we develop skills.

I injured myself today doing a deadlift where I didn’t realize how much of a jump in weight I was doing. I have worked hard to avoid injury in CrossFit, but I learned today that I will need to be more careful. I see the potential for learning a lot from this injury and how I might’ve avoided it. Injury can slow progress. We need to learn from these experiences and then carry on.

Two books to review:

The power of habit.

Grit.

Which Decisions are Strongest?

Are my decisions strongest when I am making them in the moment? … or when I have carefully considered and planned them?

Often, I get distracted from goals and plans because I make a different decision in the moment than I did when I carefully considered it. This doesn’t seem like the strongest strategy. I think that I need to have more confidence in my planning and then follow through.

Break Bad Habits with a Checklist

The idea of changing habits with a checklist is a powerful one for both individuals and organizations.

For individuals …

https://hbr.org/2017/02/break-bad-habits-with-a-simple-checklist

For organizations …

https://www.amazon.ca/Checklist-Manifesto-How-Things-Right-ebook/dp/B0030V0PEW

I need to have enough confidence in the checklist to trust it enough to discount my feelings in the moment in order to stick to my plan (that I have carefully thought through).

Sprint Distance Triathlon is a Lifetime Sport

This is an interesting article from the  American Academy of Pediatrics about why Sprint Distance Triathlon is a Lifetime Sport.

Although I like the Olympic distance and I have done the 70.3 distance triathlons, I worry about the fatigue and injury as distances get longer. I wonder about the wisdom of trying to train for an “Iron Man”. Is that really healthier?

The shorter distances, however, still have the benefits of training in multiple disciplines but without quite the same effects on my life. I may just stick to Sprints and Olympic distances in the future. Realistically, for the life that I live, this kind of training is likely to give me better health value for the time spent.